Safety and Site Support

DDC’s Safety and Site Support Division does everything from on-site safety and quality-assurance inspections to rapidly responding to emergency hazardous material cleanups. This team also maintains and updates the City’s extensive archive of maps and surveys. They also create much of the data that is used for the NYCMap.

City Hall Renovation Project In Final Phase

(via New York Design Commission Announces Excellence in Design Winners)

Keeping Construction Safety a Priority

In a white paper, Building a Proactive Safety Culture in the Construction Industry by the Philadelpia-based ACE Group, George Cesarini, Geoffrey Hall and Matthew Kupiec of ACE’s Construction unit discuss the need for construction companies to build a culture of safety that is ingrained at all levels, beginning at the top. The authors recommend 12 steps to strengthen construction site safety.

America's Leading Design Cities

thisbigcity:

Can we solve environmental problems by tackling them in the city?

URBAN BY NATURE - the sixth edition of the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam - runs until August 24. Rotterdam’s Kunsthal and Natural History Museum host the main exhibition. 

More information here

Photos by Sue Barr, Maarten Laupman and James Morgan.

After years of cuts and being under-served, the Bronx is getting a boost in arts education
thisiscitylab:


The very notion of public space, a subject largely reserved for design professionals until about a decade ago, is a hot topic today. The threshold event that pushed it into popular consciousness was probably 2011’s Occupy Wall Street encampment in Lower Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park—a privately owned public space, just to add another level of complexity. Worldwide, the protests in Tahrir Square in Cairo that year also underscored the connection between place and public discourse, with all the mobilization power of social media mixed in. In recent years, the practice of guerrilla urbanism—taking over parking spaces or entire streets for mini parklets, spontaneous art displays, and chair bombings—has further changed the definition and understanding of public space and its function.

-Who Really Owns Public Spaces?
[Image credits (clockwise): Francisca Sumar, Stephen Mallon, Julienne Schaer, Landgarden]

thisiscitylab:

The very notion of public space, a subject largely reserved for design professionals until about a decade ago, is a hot topic today. The threshold event that pushed it into popular consciousness was probably 2011’s Occupy Wall Street encampment in Lower Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park—a privately owned public space, just to add another level of complexity. Worldwide, the protests in Tahrir Square in Cairo that year also underscored the connection between place and public discourse, with all the mobilization power of social media mixed in. In recent years, the practice of guerrilla urbanism—taking over parking spaces or entire streets for mini parklets, spontaneous art displays, and chair bombings—has further changed the definition and understanding of public space and its function.

-Who Really Owns Public Spaces?

[Image credits (clockwise): Francisca Sumar, Stephen Mallon, Julienne Schaer, Landgarden]

How NYC Works: Thousands of Miles of Pipes Make Up City’s Complex Sewer System

In the latest installment of “How New York City Works,” NY1’s Roger Clark takes a look at the city’s wastewater treatment system to find out what happens to all of the dirty water we send down the drain.

(via Koolhaas’ CCTV Headquarters Crowned Best Tall Building in The World)

Tour NYC's First Prefab Emergency Housing Units

Designed by Garrison Architects, the units come in two varieties: a 480-square-foot one-bedroom and an 813-square-foot three-bedroom. More than giving displaced homeowners a dry and safe place to stay, Barton said these units would be placed in the residents’ original neighborhoods while their original lodgings are rebuilt. Following the disastrous aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, New Yorkers were forced to find temporary dwelling in cramped hotel rooms while others chose to stay in their damaged houses. Now the OEM wants to give disaster victims a place to stay with many of the comforts of their original homes, including a living area, storage, a full kitchen, and bedroom(s).